Bay Area CAIR executive director draws fire for anti-military remarks

Egyptian woman 1900-1920

Photo Credit: This US Library of Congress photo was published between 1900-1920. The garb worn by this “woman of Cairo” isn’t dramatically different from garb worn in some countries today where theocrats continue to dictate how a woman can dress. [Image: American Colony (Jerusalem)]

Over Memorial Day weekend, the San Francisco Bay Area executive director for CAIR drew fire for remarks on Twitter about the U.S. military. Zahra Billoo tweeted:

“Zahra Billoo ‏@ZahraBilloo May 23
struggles with Memorial Day each year. How does one balance being pretty staunchly anti-war while honoring those who died in the military?” 

Billoo bills herself as someone who “want[s] to be a progressive, radical, tree-hugging, super-hero when I grow up.”

Billoo also retweeted messages from an anti-American “poet” whose primary interest is “Palestine.” His messages were more vitriolic than hers.

Billoo claimed approximately “1/3 of the slaves were Muslim.” I assume she referred to slaves in the U.S., not slaves in countries where her faith dictates every aspect of a citizen’s life.

Slavery in Muslim countries was practiced far longer than in the U.S. Slavery was common in the ancient world, but like many other “progressives”, Billoo applies a narrow lens. The obsession with U.S. slavery is purely political, and every living American, regardless of color or faith, has directly or indirectly subsidized reparations in the form of social justice progressives love to preach.

Whether 1/3 of U.S. slaves were actually Muslims is anyone’s guess, but I question the figure. I looked briefly for her source, but found none.

Billoo traded barbs with an individual who may have family members in the military, and the SFB area CAIR executive director asked, “Which war?” after the individual said soldiers died for her freedom.

I weighed in on that one, because Billoo is among millions on the left who refuse to acknowledge the fact we are engaged in a world war America did not start. I responded:

“The world war waged by anti-West imperialists bent on subjecting the world to hijacked version of your faith.”

Billoo did an interview with a website belonging to a group of women lawyers. Billoo naturally struggles with reconciling her “progressive” standards to a faith that has largely not progressed in many parts of the world since the middle ages. Note the sizable double standard Billoo promotes:

“… I have been to mosques where they are hesitant to have a woman speak to the larger crowd. Rather then ending the relationship based on that, I have turned around and invested energy in building personal relationships in that community and proving my competency through our services.”

It’s impossible to reconcile Western concepts of full rights for women with current pronouncements on Billoo’s faith from status quo scholars in many countries, other than America. Here, the U.S. military and our government are legally required to support freedom of speech, even when navel-gazing progs decide to do a little trolling on a day when Americans honor their dead who died in war.

It’d be a great idea for Billoo to read some world history while she’s at it, and perhaps to weigh in on the practice of de facto slavery for women in any number of countries where old men who have carved their way to power make “holy” pronouncements and continue to repress females while blaming everyone but themselves for the sorry state of affairs in their corner of the globe.

Billoo didn’t weigh in on the internecine battles and loss of life resulting from disputes within her own faith—Sunni, Shia, and sects one or both of the major sectors decide are blasphemous. Glass house seems too kind an analogy here.

If you read press releases and content on the national website for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, the most significant message you probably take away is that the group is adept at using the U.S. courts system. The other message is standard victimology so popular these days with political movements funded by ________________ . Discover the Networks offers some information about CAIR funding.

It’s my opinion CAIR doesn’t represent most Muslims who live in America, and I seriously doubt Billoo’s San Francisco chapter of CAIR does either. The good news is she can spout all the nonsense she wants on Twitter, insult the military or whatever she desires, and she won’t be flogged or lose her head.

(Opinion by Kay B. Day/May 27, 2014)

Photo Credit: This US Library of Congress photo was published between 1900-1920. The garb worn by this “woman of Cairo” isn’t dramatically different from garb worn in some countries today where theocrats continue to dictate how a woman can dress. [Image: American Colony (Jerusalem)]

About Kay Day

Kay B. Day is a freelance writer who has published in national and international magazines and websites. The author of 3 books, her work is anthologized in textbooks and collections. She has won awards for poetry, nonfiction and fiction. Day is a member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors and the Authors Guild.
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3 Responses to Bay Area CAIR executive director draws fire for anti-military remarks

  1. Pingback: After honor killing of pregnant woman, Human Rights Commission struggles in Pakistan | DAY ON THE DAY

  2. Gene Retske says:

    I took an African history class back in the late 1960s, before political correctness had destroyed our secondary education system. In that class, we learned that Africa of the 17th and 18th centuries was a caste type system, with Muslims at the top of most societies. It was the Muslim warlords who sold defeated African tribes into slavery.

    So, I doubt the 1/3 number, and suspect that there were very few Muslims sold into slavery, since they were doing the selling.

    • Kay Day says:

      Gene, the best figure I could come up with, and even that is in dispute, is 10 percent. That came from a book by Edward Curtis (‘Muslims in America’). The way my Westernized mind perceives it, however, is that in many countries in the Mideast and N. Africa, a state of de facto slavery still exists and especially for females.

      I often wonder why US schools don’t teach the practice of slavery from a global standpoint. Seems near-criminal to ignore the long history of it, and the color-blindness of it as well in many countries. Best! KBD

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