Trump tops delegates needed for nomination, touts energy for US economy

Reception of Trump’s speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee in Washington, DC on Monday was enthusiastic, with frequent loud applause. Even National Review acknowledged standing ovations from a “charmed” crowd for the GOP frontrunner during an event where a walkout failed to materialize. (Snip: donaldjtrump.com)

Reception of Trump’s speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee in Washington, DC on Monday was enthusiastic, with frequent loud applause. Even National Review acknowledged standing ovations from a “charmed” crowd for the GOP frontrunner during an event where a walkout failed to materialize. (Snip: donaldjtrump.com)

Donald Trump has secured the number of delegates for the Republican presidential nomination.

Trump was destined to win the nomination anyway because he was already so close to the oft-cited “magic” number of 1237, with five more primaries taking place on June 7. California or one of the other states would have easily put him over the top.

According to Fox News, Trump secured the nomination early because of “a small number of the party’s unbound delegates who said they would support him at the convention.” 

Trump thanked his supporters at a presser in Bismarck (ND) where, unlike most presidential candidates past and present, he took questions from media without using a teleprompter or reciting lines from a campaign playbook as Mrs. Hillary Clinton usually does.

Feb. 16 ad snip Trump campaign

February, 2016 Ad snip; Donald Trump campaign site

Lines like “Obama doesn’t know what the hell he is doing” resonate with grassroots voters across the nation, who are tired of canned rhetoric that’s as bland as something you’d read on a cereal box.

Trump’s announcement about the nomination occurred as the nation digested news about Mrs. Clinton’s deceptive email practices which most of us would call illegal but pro-leftist media characterized as not abiding by the rules.

Besides Mrs. Clinton’s email scandal, the administration she served was the subject of more shocking revelations as Americans learned via a watchdog group the guns US federales trafficked in the operation popularly referred to as ‘Fast and Furious’ have been “tied to at least 69 killings.”

Legacy media haven’t asked the obvious question. How did the US government traffic guns illegally into Mexico without the secretary of state knowing something about it?

As Trump held the presser, he looked presidential. He exercised a bit more restraint in his responses to reporters’ questions than he does on the stump, but he still comes off in a way most politicians never have and never will.

Meanwhile in Bismarck, people were lining up to hear him; he’s in North Dakota to talk about his energy policy. Trump understands how vital the energy sector is to the US economy, and he made it clear all forms of energy are on the table but cost is a definite factor. Besides the cost, he also mentioned the number of eagles windmills have killed. Even the anti-Trump writers at an Internet tabloid have had to admit the danger windmills pose to birds. The Obama administration has given that sector a pass on the matter.

Once five more state primaries are held on June 7, Trump will have handily topped the number of delegates he needed to secure the GOP nomination most experts predicted he would never get.

Meanwhile on Twitter, anti-Trump pundit Bill Kristol appeared to be having a near-meltdown. He’s already proposed his dream ticket for 2016—losing 2012 nominee Mitt Romney at the top and New Mexico governor Susana Martinez on bottom. Martinez became a Republican in the mid-1990s. Kristol frequently uses the hashtag #RunMittRun.

Kristol, like other dinosaurs who have long controlled messaging on politics for both parties, may be having trouble adjusting to an era where legacy media has little to no credibility with the American public.

Trump was confident at the presser and thanked his supporters while he chose to avoid undue criticism of forces working against him within the status quo power structure on both sides of the aisle.

A third party run would probably have little impact on Trump’s likely victory over Mrs. Clinton in November. Most Republicans aren’t willing to risk another loss like the past two cycles because we know exactly the depth of Mrs. Clinton’s anti-USA policies and the harmful impact on the middle class.

After all, the Clinton machine has run the administration of Barack Obama the entire time he’s been in office.

Democrats are worried about their all-but-confirmed nominee, Mrs. Clinton. That was evidenced by Obama’s inappropriate remarks in the communist country of Vietnam where the president bad mouthed the GOP nominee.

(Commentary by Kay B. Day/May 26, 2016)

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About Kay Day

Kay B. Day is a freelance writer who has published in national and international magazines and websites. The author of 3 books, her work is anthologized in textbooks and collections. She has won awards for poetry, nonfiction and fiction. Day is a member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors and the Authors Guild.

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