National Lutheran organization brings Israel bias to fruition with political resolution

Lutheran Common Service book

The Lutheran Common Service Book, 1917. Many of the hymns in this book are no longer used in services. My mother inscribed this book to my oldest daughter more than 20 years ago. The scribbles on the left page are mine as I practiced penmanship in church. My mother put a stop to that.

For several years, I perceived the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the national organization for the faith, as trending anti-Israel. Rhetoric began to be far more biased towards what is now called the ‘Palestinian Cause’. The ELCA in general began to trend far left, and nowhere was it more evident in sermons I heard at various churches.

In the last few years, I simply stopped attending church regularly, although I continued to practice my faith in terms of prayer, creed, and confession. If I want to hear politics, all I have to do is turn on the TV.

Now the bias towards Israel has come full circle. 

Spurred on by a movement called Isaiah 58, the ELCA passed a resolution based on a one-sided political stance. The Times of Israel reported:

“’The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America approved a resolution calling on the US government to end all aid to Israel if Israel does not stop building settlements and ‘enable an independent Palestinian state.’

Voting at its triennial assembly in New Orleans that ended Saturday, the church also sought a halt to all investment in companies that profit from Israel’s occupation and called on US President Barack Obama to recognize the State of Palestine.”

Adding insult to injury for many of us interested in our faith offering spiritual guidance rather than political proselytizing, ELCA did some finger-pointing, naming a number of US based companies listed by the Delaware-Maryland Synod Assembly as “profiting from, or complicit in, human rights violations arising from the occupation…”

The ELCA has adopted the approach the left in the US adopted—Israel is the bad guy in the conflict over turf taken when Israel was attacked by a number of Arab countries in the 1967 war. It took the tiny nation of Israel six days to win a war against a collection of larger countries with established military power.

Personally speaking, I believe that as global politics have changed positions over decades, Israel and the people in the contested territory would be better served by working out solutions for themselves. Far too many politicos with a personal agenda have interfered in this process and that is one reason no solution has been agreed upon.

If you’re not familiar with the issue, you can read about it from both sides.

In an article penned for the conservative publication Front Page, Joseph Klein explains Israel’s predicament and the bias many media have come to display towards a nation founded after millions of Jews were murdered simply for being Jews.

In an article penned for the leftwing iconic newspaper Haaretz, Hassan Jabareen explains why ‘Palestinians’ won’t recognize Israel, the “Jewish State.”

At The Jewish Virtual Library, there’s an article explaining how the term ‘Palestinians’ came to be used after 1920.

Besides the anti-Israel, anti-US economy resolution, ELCA was on a roll in a more than 100 page document, affirming a movement many of us believes goes against Biblical Teaching—Black Lives Matter. The Bible states God created man, implying there is only one race, the human race. Perhaps the ELCA forgot that. Recent vandalism, violence, and racist rhetoric coming from Milwaukee symbolize just how far a political opportunist group will go in seeking attention and power.

Bearing in mind the millions of federal taxpayer dollars faith-based groups receive each year, the ELCA also pushed sanctuary policies for Central American minors, many of whom are young adults and most of whom cannot be vetted. As taxpayers on the local, state, and national levels fund uncontrolled migration the Obama administration has nurtured, faith-based groups will capitalize on increased federal dollars.

Meanwhile, our open borders policy has led to the presence and expansion of transnational gangs bent on violence and predatory practices. Most impacted are the very communities groups like Black Lives Matter claim to represent even as they damage property and people in those communities.

The FBI in a report gives an idea of what US communities are up against, courtesy of politicians and groups working in tandem to throw borders wide open:

“La Mara Salvatrucha, or MS-13, and the 18th Street gang require their mostly teenage recruits to undergo at least two years of initiation before becoming full-fledged gang members. One of the final tests for membership is to commit murder.”

For a Biblical perspective on borders and immigration, see the analysis A Biblical Perspective on Immigration Policy by James R. Edwards, Jr., at the Center for Immigration Studies. He includes an excellent explanation of the term “sojourn” or “temporary stay”.

Lutheranism is the faith of my ancestors pre-dating their early 1700s arrival in the colonies that eventually became the USA. My family has practiced that faith since that time.

Over decades, I’ve witnessed changes that would lead my grandmother to roll over in her grave, including almost always using hymns the congregation can barely sing and thus can derive little spiritual reflection from. Two years ago, as my family attended Christmas Eve services, the pastor launched into an analysis of media he considered acceptable for intelligent people. For me, that was the last straw.

I understand churches must change with times, but combined with politics in the pulpit, the changes I have seen lead me to believe not only my faith but a number of faiths have become a tool of the state purely for profit.

The ELCA’s anti-Israel resolution is a dark day in a faith I have long cherished.

Furthermore, I would urge the left controlling the ELCA to take a hard look at world history and see what happens to countries and faiths when borders are erased.

Thus while I keep my faith, I am without a church for now.

(Commentary by Kay B. Day/Aug. 15, 2016)

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About Kay Day

Kay B. Day is a freelance writer who has published in national and international magazines and websites. The author of 3 books, her work is anthologized in textbooks and collections. She has won awards for poetry, nonfiction and fiction. Day is a member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors and the Authors Guild.
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20 Responses to National Lutheran organization brings Israel bias to fruition with political resolution

  1. Jerry Monroe says:

    “The kingdom of Christ is spiritual (John 18:36)…, the gospel does not introduce laws concerning the civil state.” (Apology of the Augsburg Confession, Article 16, Sections 54, 58) http://www.bookofconcord.org/defense_15_politicalorder.php

  2. Jerry Monroe says:

    “Whenever David attacked an area, he did not leave a man or woman alive, but took sheep and cattle, donkeys and camels and clothes.” (1 Samuel 27:9)

    “David had done what was right in the eyes of the Lord and had not failed to keep any of the Lord’s commands all the days of his life–except in the case of Uriah the Hittite.” (I Kings 15:5)

    “The emperor may follow the example of David in making war to drive away the Turk from his country.” (Augsburg Confession, Article 21, Section 1) http://www.bookofconcord.org/augsburgconfession.php#article19

  3. Jerry Monroe says:

    “When the Lord your God brings you into the land you are entering to possess and drives out before you many nations–the Hittites, Girgashites, Amorites, Canaanites, Perizzites, Hivites and Jebusites, seven nations larger and stronger than you–and when the Lord your God has delivered them over to you and you have defeated them then you must destroy them totally. Make no treaty with them, and show them no mercy. Do not intermarry with them. Do not give your daughters to their sons or take their daughters for your sons, for they will turn your sons away from following me to serve other gods, and the Lord’s anger will burn against you and quickly destroy you.” (Deuteronomy 7:1-4)

    “In the cities of the nations the Lord your God is giving you as an inheritance, do not leave alive anything that breathes. Completely destroy them.” (Deuteronomy 20:16-17)

    “Samuel said to Saul, ‘I am the one the Lord sent to anoint you king over his people Israel; so listen now to the message from the Lord. This is what the Lord Almighty says: “I will punish the Amalekites for what they did to Israel when they waylaid them as they came up from Egypt. Now go, attack the Amalekites and totally destroy everything that belongs to them. Do not spare them; put to death men and women, children and infants, cattle and sheep, camels and donkeys.”‘ …But Saul and the army spared Agag and the best of the sheep and cattle…. [Samuel said to Saul], ‘The Lord anointed you king over Israel. And he sent you on a mission, saying, “Go and completely destroy those wicked people, the Amalekites; make war on them until you have wiped them out.” Why did you not obey the Lord?’ …[Samuel said to Saul], ‘You have rejected the word of the Lord, and the Lord has rejected you as king over Israel.’ …And Samuel put Agag to death before the Lord at Gilgal.” (1 Samuel 15:1-3, 9,17-19, 26, 33)

  4. Jonathon says:

    3. Finally, the Bible is full of stories of the unclean outsider who demonstrates more faith and more compassion than the acceptable faithful insider. The call in Matthew 25 makes NO distinction based on country of origin or ethnicity, religious faith or sexuality. It only states that whatever you do to the least of these, my brothers, you do unto me. That’s it. So, yes, we in this country face a complicated picture of immigration in part because we have perpetuated a system that creates a market for illegal workers to come into the country. At the same time, we have restricted our legal immigration process from Latin America in response to illegal immigration so that people faced with desperate situations in Guatemala and other nations feel forced into a dangerous and illegal process of entering the country. Desperate families have sent their children alone through pathways controlled by Mexican gangs and drug cartels only to be dropped off at the border with nothing. At the same time, people who have overstayed their visas or who never obtained legal status remain in this nation for years, raising families, working, and never faced with a chance for citizenship or threatened with expulsion. In many ways, the US has been complicit in a human rights crisis – where illegal immigrant workers are exploited by employers because of their illegal status, we have made it difficult for refugees to immigrate even on a temporary basis, and we have not done an adequate job of maintaining our own laws. So, now, in a complicated system, we must act in a way that shows compassion and justice. Thus, I am not, as a Christian going to leave children out in the cold. I am not, as a Christian, going to force families apart. I am not, as a Christian going to accept the status quo – and in part that means loosening the requirements for LEGAL immigration from Latin America and making it easier for industries to LEGALLY issue visas for migrant workers while eliminating the market for illegal and undocumented workers. In other words, we need to change a knee-jerk response to illegal immigration (shutting down and limiting channels for legal immigration) that is utterly asinine and only exacerbated the problem of illegal immigration. But, as a church, we have to be thinking NOT of politics – and here is where you are absolutely wrong about the ELCA position. When my church and others in my community set up a program to help undocumented workers get legal counsel and advocated for them to receive legal status, we were not engaged in a POLITICAL act, but an act of SERVICE. We didn’t want a family to be without a father. Though the process took a year, we successfully got this man – a hard worker who established a fine family here – legal status in this country. And our country is better for having him – and he is certainly better for being legal. The response to the crisis of migrant children was not a POLITICAL act, but a HUMAN act of compassion that says that no matter the legal status and the circumstances, which are terrible, in which they came to this country, they deserve to be fed, clothed, and cared for at least until a more tenable solution can be found – whether that is advocating for their placement with relatives and foster families here in the US or if it means safely ushering them back home – both solutions which have been implemented by our nation in conjunction with a myriad of social advocacy organizations, many associated with Christian organizations of various identities. The message of the Gospel is NEVER – “only” my people matter – it is always expanding the circle of who is included – and often challenging people to see this fact more clearly. It is the reason the Samaritan is the ONLY one who acts with justice and compassion for the man who was robbed – this person who was considered unclean and outside the limited group of the chosen people – was the one who gave generously of his time and his possessions to show compassion to the victim. Notably, it wasn’t the people with the “right” idea of faith and the “right” identity who did this. It was the “wrong” person. May we stop doing wrong through our insistence on being right.

  5. Jonathon says:

    2. The Black Lives Matter movement is a symptom of continued inequity and injustice in the US social system…a perpetuation of racial tensions and issues rooted in a long history of racism in this nation that have not been solved, but continue. Of course all lives matter, that is the entire point of Psalm 139 which I posted above, but the problem is it is clear that we are not living out that truth. The problem of merely saying “all lives matter,” is actually to continue to deny the fact that this is not true in practice. We face severe segregation in our nation’s cities and gross inequality of opportunity and economic stability in this country. Years of this type of inequality spark protest movements. However, as with many of these movements throughout history, despite an overall message of peace, violence has unfortunately tended to erupt from a people frustrated, angry, and sometimes opportunistic in a time of unrest. To say that supporting the idea that “Black Lives Matter” and the actual stated purpose of the organization is to support the violence perpetrated by others is to bear false witness and to utterly fail to have any trust in your fellow man. No one condones violence and destruction, including the ELCA. However, the violence we see, and the advocacy that is being done is not borne out of a vacuum. Milwaukee is one of the most segregated cities economically and racially in the entire country. There is no good reason for violence to erupt, and yet, it is a symptom of a larger problem. Dismissing the larger problem because some people turn to criminal acts in their frustration and yes, their opportunism, is NOT the proper path. We can condemn violence AND work for social equity and justice. But, it is not clean – it is a messy proposition.

  6. Jonathon says:

    At times, church bodies can and do involve themselves at least peripherally into the messiness of the political world, doing the best that we can to commit to the messages of Matthew 25, considering that all people are referenced in Psalm 139, and trying to balance with the commands of Exodus 20. However, the messiness of this world makes taking stands somewhat difficult and makes it impossible to unequivocally side with a particular movement or political entity, particularly when they do not ascribe to the same messages. And, YOU are mistaking taking positions allied with particular political movements for the REAL position that asks in ALL the instances you cite with as much false witness and bias as you can for justice, reconciliation, and peace for all people.

    1. The Israel/Palestine resolutions are not meant to “punish” Israel – it is meant to hold all people accountable to international law when it comes to the treatment of others. The settlements in the West Bank are violations of that law, and yet Israel continues the practice with impunity. That is not right. At the same time, Palestinian forces continue to react violently to what they see as a threat to their own existence – this is also not to be tolerated or accepted. At the core of the message is to pull support away IF human rights violations are perpetuated and to support industries that are engaged in making lives better and more peaceable both for Palestinians and Israelis. The resolutions are based on a CRY from CHRISTIANS in Jordan and Palestine – many exiled from Palestine and others who face discrimination and hardship because of apartheid policies in Israel. The idea is to work for GOOD – and not to assume that Israel does no wrong nor that the terrorist element in Palestine is right. The thing is that ACTUAL real people who work for peace, many of them Christian, but of course a majority of them are Muslims are caught in this injustice that continues to exist in the region. Today, it seems we are at an impasse where NO ONE seems particularly interested in addressing the issue – and so it falls to advocates to move us again towards working for those who continue to be victims of a complex system of violence and oppression that both sides of this conflict are guilty of perpetuating.

  7. Jonathon says:

    At times, church bodies can and do involve themselves at least peripherally into the messiness of the political world, doing the best that we can to commit to the messages of Matthew 25, considering that all people are referenced in Psalm 139, and trying to balance with the commands of Exodus 20. However, the messiness of this world makes taking stands somewhat difficult and makes it impossible to unequivocally side with a particular movement or political entity, particularly when they do not ascribe to the same messages. And, YOU are mistaking taking positions allied with particular political movements for the REAL position that asks in ALL the instances you cite with as much false witness and bias as you can for justice, reconciliation, and peace for all people.

    1. The Israel/Palestine resolutions are not meant to “punish” Israel – it is meant to hold all people accountable to international law when it comes to the treatment of others. The settlements in the West Bank are violations of that law, and yet Israel continues the practice with impunity. That is not right. At the same time, Palestinian forces continue to react violently to what they see as a threat to their own existence – this is also not to be tolerated or accepted. At the core of the message is to pull support away IF human rights violations are perpetuated and to support industries that are engaged in making lives better and more peaceable both for Palestinians and Israelis. The resolutions are based on a CRY from CHRISTIANS in Jordan and Palestine – many exiled from Palestine and others who face discrimination and hardship because of apartheid policies in Israel. The idea is to work for GOOD – and not to assume that Israel does no wrong nor that the terrorist element in Palestine is right. The thing is that ACTUAL real people who work for peace, many of them Christian, but of course a majority of them are Muslims are caught in this injustice that continues to exist in the region. Today, it seems we are at an impasse where NO ONE seems particularly interested in addressing the issue – and so it falls to advocates to move us again towards working for those who continue to be victims of a complex system of violence and oppression that both sides of this conflict are guilty of perpetuating.

    2. The Black Lives Matter movement is a symptom of continued inequity and injustice in the US social system…a perpetuation of racial tensions and issues rooted in a long history of racism in this nation that have not been solved, but continue. Of course all lives matter, that is the entire point of Psalm 139 which I posted above, but the problem is it is clear that we are not living out that truth. The problem of merely saying “all lives matter,” is actually to continue to deny the fact that this is not true in practice. We face severe segregation in our nation’s cities and gross inequality of opportunity and economic stability in this country. Years of this type of inequality spark protest movements. However, as with many of these movements throughout history, despite an overall message of peace, violence has unfortunately tended to erupt from a people frustrated, angry, and sometimes opportunistic in a time of unrest. To say that supporting the idea that “Black Lives Matter” and the actual stated purpose of the organization is to support the violence perpetrated by others is to bear false witness and to utterly fail to have any trust in your fellow man. No one condones violence and destruction, including the ELCA. However, the violence we see, and the advocacy that is being done is not borne out of a vacuum. Milwaukee is one of the most segregated cities economically and racially in the entire country. There is no good reason for violence to erupt, and yet, it is a symptom of a larger problem. Dismissing the larger problem because some people turn to criminal acts in their frustration and yes, their opportunism, is NOT the proper path. We can condemn violence AND work for social equity and justice. But, it is not clean – it is a messy proposition.

    3. Finally, the Bible is full of stories of the unclean outsider who demonstrates more faith and more compassion than the acceptable faithful insider. The call in Matthew 25 makes NO distinction based on country of origin or ethnicity, religious faith or sexuality. It only states that whatever you do to the least of these, my brothers, you do unto me. That’s it. So, yes, we in this country face a complicated picture of immigration in part because we have perpetuated a system that creates a market for illegal workers to come into the country. At the same time, we have restricted our legal immigration process from Latin America in response to illegal immigration so that people faced with desperate situations in Guatemala and other nations feel forced into a dangerous and illegal process of entering the country. Desperate families have sent their children alone through pathways controlled by Mexican gangs and drug cartels only to be dropped off at the border with nothing. At the same time, people who have overstayed their visas or who never obtained legal status remain in this nation for years, raising families, working, and never faced with a chance for citizenship or threatened with expulsion. In many ways, the US has been complicit in a human rights crisis – where illegal immigrant workers are exploited by employers because of their illegal status, we have made it difficult for refugees to immigrate even on a temporary basis, and we have not done an adequate job of maintaining our own laws. So, now, in a complicated system, we must act in a way that shows compassion and justice. Thus, I am not, as a Christian going to leave children out in the cold. I am not, as a Christian, going to force families apart. I am not, as a Christian going to accept the status quo – and in part that means loosening the requirements for LEGAL immigration from Latin America and making it easier for industries to LEGALLY issue visas for migrant workers while eliminating the market for illegal and undocumented workers. In other words, we need to change a knee-jerk response to illegal immigration (shutting down and limiting channels for legal immigration) that is utterly asinine and only exacerbated the problem of illegal immigration. But, as a church, we have to be thinking NOT of politics – and here is where you are absolutely wrong about the ELCA position. When my church and others in my community set up a program to help undocumented workers get legal counsel and advocated for them to receive legal status, we were not engaged in a POLITICAL act, but an act of SERVICE. We didn’t want a family to be without a father. Though the process took a year, we successfully got this man – a hard worker who established a fine family here – legal status in this country. And our country is better for having him – and he is certainly better for being legal. The response to the crisis of migrant children was not a POLITICAL act, but a HUMAN act of compassion that says that no matter the legal status and the circumstances, which are terrible, in which they came to this country, they deserve to be fed, clothed, and cared for at least until a more tenable solution can be found – whether that is advocating for their placement with relatives and foster families here in the US or if it means safely ushering them back home – both solutions which have been implemented by our nation in conjunction with a myriad of social advocacy organizations, many associated with Christian organizations of various identities. The message of the Gospel is NEVER – “only” my people matter – it is always expanding the circle of who is included – and often challenging people to see this fact more clearly. It is the reason the Samaritan is the ONLY one who acts with justice and compassion for the man who was robbed – this person who was considered unclean and outside the limited group of the chosen people – was the one who gave generously of his time and his possessions to show compassion to the victim. Notably, it wasn’t the people with the “right” idea of faith and the “right” identity who did this. It was the “wrong” person. May we stop doing wrong through our insistence on being right.

  8. Jonathon says:

    Finally, I would suggest this: 3 “You shall have no other gods before[a] me.

    4 “You shall not make for yourself an image in the form of anything in heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the waters below. 5 You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, punishing the children for the sin of the parents to the third and fourth generation of those who hate me, 6 but showing love to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my commandments.

    7 “You shall not misuse the name of the Lord your God, for the Lord will not hold anyone guiltless who misuses his name.

    8 “Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy. 9 Six days you shall labor and do all your work, 10 but the seventh day is a sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work, neither you, nor your son or daughter, nor your male or female servant, nor your animals, nor any foreigner residing in your towns. 11 For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, but he rested on the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.

    12 “Honor your father and your mother, so that you may live long in the land the Lord your God is giving you.

    13 “You shall not murder.

    14 “You shall not commit adultery.

    15 “You shall not steal.

    16 “You shall not give false testimony against your neighbor.

    17 “You shall not covet your neighbor’s house. You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife, or his male or female servant, his ox or donkey, or anything that belongs to your neighbor.”

  9. Jonathon says:

    And this: You have searched me, Lord,
    and you know me.
    2 You know when I sit and when I rise;
    you perceive my thoughts from afar.
    3 You discern my going out and my lying down;
    you are familiar with all my ways.
    4 Before a word is on my tongue
    you, Lord, know it completely.
    5 You hem me in behind and before,
    and you lay your hand upon me.
    6 Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.
    7 Where can I go from your Spirit?
    Where can I flee from your presence?
    8 If I go up to the heavens, you are there;
    if I make my bed in the depths, you are there.
    9 If I rise on the wings of the dawn,
    if I settle on the far side of the sea,
    10 even there your hand will guide me,
    your right hand will hold me fast.
    11 If I say, “Surely the darkness will hide me
    and the light become night around me,”
    12 even the darkness will not be dark to you;
    the night will shine like the day,
    for darkness is as light to you.
    13 For you created my inmost being;
    you knit me together in my mother’s womb.
    14 I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made;
    your works are wonderful,
    I know that full well.
    15 My frame was not hidden from you
    when I was made in the secret place,
    when I was woven together in the depths of the earth.
    16 Your eyes saw my unformed body;
    all the days ordained for me were written in your book
    before one of them came to be.
    17 How precious to me are your thoughts,[a] God!
    How vast is the sum of them!
    18 Were I to count them,
    they would outnumber the grains of sand—
    when I awake, I am still with you.
    19 If only you, God, would slay the wicked!
    Away from me, you who are bloodthirsty!
    20 They speak of you with evil intent;
    your adversaries misuse your name.
    21 Do I not hate those who hate you, Lord,
    and abhor those who are in rebellion against you?
    22 I have nothing but hatred for them;
    I count them my enemies.
    23 Search me, God, and know my heart;
    test me and know my anxious thoughts.
    24 See if there is any offensive way in me,
    and lead me in the way everlasting.

  10. Jonathon says:

    Relevant passages in the reasons behind some of the resolutions.

    31 “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, he will sit on his glorious throne. 32 All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate the people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 33 He will put the sheep on his right and the goats on his left.

    34 “Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world. 35 For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, 36 I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’

    37 “Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? 38 When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? 39 When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’

    40 “The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’

    41 “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. 42 For I was hungry and you gave me nothing to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, 43 I was a stranger and you did not invite me in, I needed clothes and you did not clothe me, I was sick and in prison and you did not look after me.’

    44 “They also will answer, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or needing clothes or sick or in prison, and did not help you?’

    45 “He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.’

    46 “Then they will go away to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life.”

    • kbdjax1 says:

      Not moved by your exegesis. At. All. Israel and the people in ‘Palestine’ should work out their problems without outside interference. As for Muslims being harmed by other Muslims, take that up with the mullahs. You can spout Biblical passages all day long. ELCA, in my opinion, committed an attack on Israel, a country struggling for survival since its birth.

      As for Black Lives Matter? Really? If these people were white, the government would deem that movement a terrorist movement. The US has done more to correct past wrongs *committed by government* than any other country in the world. BLM calls for the killing of policemen. How ELCA can offer this org any kind of respect is far beyond me.

  11. If you’re in the Maryland area, we’re down here in Columbia and are building out a discipling culture. We’re outside the mainstream of your/our denomination and we kind of like it that way. Peace, Brian

  12. RevnPadre says:

    As far as I can tell, the LCMS still pretty much sticks to Biblical stuff like sin, forgiveness, mercy, hope and salvation, except when the government tries to take away our rights to live as we believe, you know, “freedom of religion” nonsense. Come on over the great divide for a week or two and try us on for size.

    • kbdjax1 says:

      Thank you. I will look for a LCMS congregation here. I am just tired of politicos cloaked as clergy.

    • Jonathon says:

      As does the ELCA. That is the whole point of the work of compassion, mercy, and salvation that is done in the name of working for those who are marginalized, oppressed, and in need.

      • kbdjax1 says:

        The ELCA is a perfect tool of the government. That tactic has never worked out for the people. And Lutheran orgs,just like Catholic orgs, benefit from legalized human trafficking. You mention the migrant situation above. That is a government-induced problem, and many of us have attempted to speak out about it and what do we hear? That we are racists. There is only one race in the Bible you quote so prolifically–the human race.

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